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Applying Learner-Centered Principles to Middle School Education

Judith L. Meece
Theory Into Practice
Vol. 42, No. 2, Learner-Centered Principles: A Framework for Teaching (Spring, 2003), pp. 109-116
Published by: Taylor & Francis, Ltd.
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1477351
Page Count: 8
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Abstract

This article draws on a goal perspective of motivation to examine the use of the Learned-Centered Psychological Principles (LCPs) for improving the academic engagement and learning of middle school students. Using survey data from 2,200 middle school students from diverse communities across the United States, the findings indicate many important motivational benefits of learner-centered practices for young adolescents. Specifically, students reported more positive forms of motivation and greater academic engagement when they perceived their teachers were using learner-centered practices that involve caring, establishing higher order thinking, honoring student voices, and adapting instruction to individual needs. Suggestions for creating a learner-centered middle school classroom are highlighted.

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