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Lo spazio domestico: La tenda (ger) come centro delle relazioni sociali e di genere nella Mongolia post socialista

Hwan Young Park and Maria Arioti
La Ricerca Folklorica
No. 40, Società pastorali d'Africa e d'Asia (Oct., 1999), pp. 47-53
Published by: Grafo Spa
DOI: 10.2307/1479767
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1479767
Page Count: 7
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Lo spazio domestico: La tenda (ger) come centro delle relazioni sociali e di genere nella Mongolia post socialista
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Abstract

In this paper I examine the perception of domestic space among rural and pastoral people in post-socialist Mongolia. My focus here is primarily the Mongolian tent, where the division of domestic space into male and female sectors is unique and important for gender studies. I show that in rural Mongolia, where nomadic life depends upon efficiency and mobility, the inside of the tent has to be arranged in an orderly fashion. Gender divisions have a harmonising function, since their purpose is to strengthen the family unit as a whole. Similarly, although gender divisions of space within the tent prove to be divisive in some respects, they may also help to make the family - as well as the kinship group at large - a more efficient unit. For the sake of social and economic security, it is essential for pastoral Mongolians to maintain social networks outside the tent and thus to extend their domestic space into a larger conceptual space. The efficient organisation of domestic space inside the tent is therefore a necessary precondition for the domestication of outer conceptual space, which is accomplished by mapping gender, language and the expansion of social and kinship networks.

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