Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

Cultural and Situational Contingencies and the Theory of Reasoned Action: Application to Fast Food Restaurant Consumption

Richard P. Bagozzi, Nancy Wong, Shuzo Abe and Massimo Bergami
Journal of Consumer Psychology
Vol. 9, No. 2, Cultural Psychology (2000), pp. 97-106
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1480402
Page Count: 10
  • More info
  • Cite this Item
Cultural and Situational Contingencies and the Theory of Reasoned Action: Application to Fast Food Restaurant Consumption
Preview not available

Abstract

This study investigated the usefulness of the theory of reasoned action for fast food restaurant patronage decisions. The theory of reasoned action was found to generalize across four samples drawn from the United States (N = 246), Italy (N = 123), The People's Republic of China (N = 264), and Japan (N = 419). However, predictions under the theory of reasoned action were found to vary, depending on the social setting (eating alone or eating with friends) and cultural orientation (independent vs. interdependent). Among other results, subjective norms were found to influence decisions when eating with friends, but not when alone; the effects of attitudes, subjective norms, and past behavior on intentions were greater for Americans than Italians, Chinese, or Japanese; and in general, more explained variance occurred for Western (American, Italian) than Eastern (Chinese, Japanese) cultures.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[97]
    [97]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
98
    98
  • Thumbnail: Page 
99
    99
  • Thumbnail: Page 
100
    100
  • Thumbnail: Page 
101
    101
  • Thumbnail: Page 
102
    102
  • Thumbnail: Page 
103
    103
  • Thumbnail: Page 
104
    104
  • Thumbnail: Page 
105
    105
  • Thumbnail: Page 
106
    106