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Effects of Interactive Vocabulary Instruction on the Vocabulary Learning and Reading Comprehension of Junior-High Learning Disabled Students

Candace S. Bos and Patricia L. Anders
Learning Disability Quarterly
Vol. 13, No. 1 (Winter, 1990), pp. 31-42
Published by: Sage Publications, Inc.
DOI: 10.2307/1510390
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1510390
Page Count: 12
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Effects of Interactive Vocabulary Instruction on the Vocabulary Learning and Reading Comprehension of Junior-High Learning Disabled Students
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Abstract

Drawing upon theory-driven vocabulary instruction and the vocabulary-reading comprehension connection, this study compared the effectiveness of three interactive vocabulary strategies derived from the knowledge hypothesis with definition instruction derived from the access and instrumental hypotheses. Subjects were 61 learning disabled junior-high students. Using content-area texts, students participated in one of three interactive strategies - semantic mapping (SM), semantic feature analysis (SFA), and semantic/syntactic feature analysis (SSFA) - or in definition instruction (DI). Learning was measured both at short and long term by vocabulary and comprehension multiple-choice items and written recalls. Results from the multiple-choice items suggested that students participating in the interactive strategies demonstrated greater comprehension and vocabulary learning than students receiving definition instruction. Results of the written recalls indicated qualitatively and quantitatively greater recalls at long term for students in the SFA and SSFA conditions compared with the DI condition. Implications for research and practice are discussed.

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