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A New Definition of Learning Disabilities

Donald D. Hammill, James E. Leigh, Gaye McNutt and Stephen C. Larsen
Learning Disability Quarterly
Vol. 11, No. 3, 10th Anniversary Issue (Summer, 1988), pp. 217-223
Published by: Sage Publications, Inc.
DOI: 10.2307/1510766
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1510766
Page Count: 7
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A New Definition of Learning Disabilities
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Abstract

Learning disabilities is a generic term that refers to a heterogeneous group of disorders manifested by significant difficulties in the acquisition and use of listening, speaking, reading, writing, reasoning or mathematical abilities. These disorders are intrinsic to the individual and presumed to be due to central nervous system dysfunction. Even though a learning disability may occur concomitantly with other handicapping conditions (e.g., sensory impairment, mental retardation, social and emotional disturbance) or environmental influences (e.g., cultural differences, insufficient/inappropriate instruction, psychogenic factors), it is not the direct result of those conditions or influences.

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