If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support

The Effect of the Learning Disability Label on Classroom Teachers' Ability Objectively to Observe and Interpret Child Behaviors

William R. Jacobs
Learning Disability Quarterly
Vol. 1, No. 1 (Winter, 1978), pp. 50-55
Published by: Sage Publications, Inc.
DOI: 10.2307/1510963
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1510963
Page Count: 6
  • Download PDF
  • Cite this Item

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support
The Effect of the Learning Disability Label on Classroom Teachers' Ability Objectively to Observe and Interpret Child Behaviors
Preview not available

Abstract

The effect of teacher expectations on the school performance of children has been a topic of much interest and research. Recent findings have demonstrated that for certain children, school failure may be directly related to the expectations that their teachers hold for them. Jacobs' study suggests that when the label of "learning disability" is given to a child, it can affect the ability of classroom teachers to observe and interpret child behaviors objectively. This study has obvious implications for the practice of labeling youngsters through the I.E.P. process. It also supports the development of a funding system that permits the delivery of special services to children without labeling or classifying them.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
50
    50
  • Thumbnail: Page 
51
    51
  • Thumbnail: Page 
52
    52
  • Thumbnail: Page 
53
    53
  • Thumbnail: Page 
54
    54
  • Thumbnail: Page 
55
    55