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Self-Concept in Children with Learning Disabilities: The Relationship between Global Self-Concept, Academic "Discounting," Nonacademic Self-Concept, and Perceived Social Support

Shauna Kloomok and Merith Cosden
Learning Disability Quarterly
Vol. 17, No. 2 (Spring, 1994), pp. 140-153
Published by: Sage Publications, Inc.
DOI: 10.2307/1511183
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1511183
Page Count: 14
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Self-Concept in Children with Learning Disabilities: The Relationship between Global Self-Concept, Academic "Discounting," Nonacademic Self-Concept, and Perceived Social Support
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Abstract

The purpose of this study was to explore how some children with learning disabilities maintain a positive self-concept despite academic difficulties. The study used Harter's model to investigate the relationship between global self-concept and perceived competence in general intellectual ability, specific academic subjects, athletics, behavior and appearance, and perceived social support. Data were collected on 72 elementary-school students with learning disabilities. Five hypotheses were tested: (a) children would vary in their global and academic self-concept; (b) children with high global self-concept would discount the importance of academics; (c) children with high global self-concept would perceive themselves as more intelligent; (d) children with high global self-concept would perceive themselves as more competent in other, nonacademic domains; and (e) children with high global self-concept would perceive higher levels of social support. Data supported all hypotheses except discounting. Implications for interventions with students with learning disabilities are discussed.

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