Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Elevated CO2 and Plant Species Richness Impact Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungal Spore Communities

Julie Wolf, Nancy C. Johnson, Diane L. Rowland and Peter B. Reich
The New Phytologist
Vol. 157, No. 3, Special Issue: Soil Microbes and Plant Production (Mar., 2003), pp. 579-588
Published by: Wiley on behalf of the New Phytologist Trust
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1514061
Page Count: 10
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Elevated  CO2 and Plant Species Richness Impact Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungal Spore Communities
Preview not available

Abstract

• We enumerated arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungal spore communities for 3 yr as part of a long-term CO2 enrichment experiment at Cedar Creek, Minnesota, USA. Complete factorial combinations of two levels of CO2 and N, and 16 perennial plant species grown in monoculture and 16-species polyculture were arranged in a split-plot design. • In 1998-2000, spore communities were quantified under monocultures of eight plant species. In 2000, measurements were expanded to include monocultures and polycultures of all of the plant species. • Under plant monocultures, only Glomus clarum responded significantly to CO2 elevation out of 11 species present. This response was not detectable under plant polycultures. Glomus clarum was also significantly more abundant under plant polycultures. Nitrogen addition had small negative effects on AM fungal spore abundance and species richness in 2000. The interaction of CO2 and N did not affect arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal spore communities. • We show that CO2 enrichment and plant species richness impact arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal community structure. These findings are important because altered symbiotic functioning may result.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
579
    579
  • Thumbnail: Page 
580
    580
  • Thumbnail: Page 
581
    581
  • Thumbnail: Page 
582
    582
  • Thumbnail: Page 
583
    583
  • Thumbnail: Page 
584
    584
  • Thumbnail: Page 
585
    585
  • Thumbnail: Page 
586
    586
  • Thumbnail: Page 
587
    587
  • Thumbnail: Page 
588
    588