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Interactions between Aboveground and Belowground Induction of Glucosinolates in Two Wild Brassica Species

Nicole M. van Dam, Leontien Witjes and Aleš Svatoš
The New Phytologist
Vol. 161, No. 3 (Mar., 2004), pp. 801-810
Published by: Wiley on behalf of the New Phytologist Trust
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1514543
Page Count: 10
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Interactions between Aboveground and Belowground Induction of Glucosinolates in Two Wild Brassica Species
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Abstract

• Interactions between shoot and root induction of glucosinolates in two crucifers, Brassica oleracea and B. nigra, were studied by applying the signalling hormones jasmonic acid (JA) and salicylic acid (SA). • JA application increased total shoot glucosinolate levels 1.5-3 times, but total root levels did not increase. Only root JA-application yielded a systemic response. In B. oleracea it mattered where JA was applied: root application increased aliphatic glucosinolates in the shoot, whereas shoot application increased indole glucosinolates. Plants treated with JA to both organs had profiles similar to shoot-treated plants. SA-application did not disturb the organ-specific response to JA. Increases in glucosinolate levels did not reduce plant biomass. • SA applications reduced root glucosinolates in root-treated plants. SA root-application in B. nigra resulted in lesions on the leaves and shoot-application caused a trichome response. • Plants thus respond specifically, depending on the organ that is induced and the hormone that is applied. We find a large potential for root-feeders to affect shoot-feeders. Glucosinolate induction in one organ is not constrained by induction in the other organ.

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