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The Use of Natural vs. Man-Modified Wetlands by Shorebirds and Waterbirds

R. Michael Erwin, Malcolm Coulter and Howard Cogswell
Colonial Waterbirds
Vol. 9, No. 2 (1986), pp. 137-138
Published by: Waterbird Society
DOI: 10.2307/1521205
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1521205
Page Count: 2
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Abstract

The loss of wetlands continues world-wide. The impact especially has been felt in coastal areas, but water management elsewhere has resulted in marked reductions of aquatic bird populations. Concern for wetland management led to the convocation of a symposium on waterbird and shorebird use of natural and man-modified wetlands in December 1985 at the first joint meeting of the Colonial Waterbird Group and the Pacific Seabird Group. Contributions discussed a wide cross-section of taxa, geographic area, wetland type, and level of approach. Coverage included North America, South America, and Europe.

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