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Nesting by Wood Storks in Natural, Altered, and Artificial Wetlands in Central and Northern Florida

John C. Ogden
Colonial Waterbirds
Vol. 14, No. 1 (1991), pp. 39-45
Published by: Waterbird Society
DOI: 10.2307/1521277
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1521277
Page Count: 7
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Nesting by Wood Storks in Natural, Altered, and Artificial Wetlands in Central and Northern Florida
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Abstract

The number of Wood Storks (Mycteria americana) nesting in colonies located in altered and artificial wetland sites in central and northern Florida ranged between 130 and 160 pairs in 1959-1960, and between 1019 and 2410 pairs in 1976-1986. During these same years, the total population of storks nesting in this same region doubled. Altered colony sites that contained natural wetland vegetation were used for nesting for longer periods of years and had more pairs on average than did entirely natural or artificial colony sites. The increased use of altered sites for nesting could have been a contributing factor in the growth of the central-northern Florida Wood Stork population.

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