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Genet Composition of Diphasiastrum complanatum in Western Hungary: A Case Study

Ágnes Major and Péter Ódor
American Fern Journal
Vol. 89, No. 2 (Apr. - Jun., 1999), pp. 106-123
Published by: American Fern Society
DOI: 10.2307/1547345
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1547345
Page Count: 18
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Genet Composition of Diphasiastrum complanatum in Western Hungary: A Case Study
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Abstract

The study includes an investigation of the genetic composition of a marginal ground pine (Diphasiastrum complanatum) population consisting of patches of different size. The genetic analysis was performed on the basis of 15 isozyme loci. The proportion of polymorphic loci was P=0.466; the sampled 38 ramets were classified into 21 multilocus genotypes (genets); Pielou's clonal diversity index was D=0.898. Wright's fixation indices over polymorphic loci were -0.076 (0.063) and -0.026 (0.091) at the ramet and genet-level, respectively. The observed and expected ramet-level and genet-level average heterozygosities were not significantly different in spite of the fact that at some loci genotype numbers significantly differed from Hardy-Weinberg proportions. Principal coordinates analysis revealed that the genetic composition of the genets was independent in all but one patch, and spatial autocorrelation analysis revealed significant spatial genetic structure. No individual with homozygous genotypes at all loci was observed, indicating a lack of intragametophytic selfing. Results clearly showed that in addition to clonal growth, sexual reproduction played a substantial role in the establishment and maintenance of the study population at the boundary of the species' distribution, and indicated the importance of microsite conditions.

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