Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Natural History Observations on the Gastropod Shell-Using Amphipod Photis conchicola Alderman, 1936

John W. Carter
Journal of Crustacean Biology
Vol. 2, No. 3 (Aug., 1982), pp. 328-341
Published by: Brill on behalf of The Crustacean Society
DOI: 10.2307/1548051
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1548051
Page Count: 14
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($34.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Natural History Observations on the Gastropod Shell-Using Amphipod Photis conchicola Alderman, 1936
Preview not available

Abstract

Photis conchicola is a tube-building marine amphipod that uses empty gastropod shells as a portable shelter. Observations in San Luis Obispo County, California, revealed that small (1-10 mm) empty shells are used as domiciles to contain soft tubes constructed from silk spun by P. conchicola in intertidal and subtidal regions. Domiciles are attached to marine plants in maximum densities of 38 per 1/16 m2. Selection of plants is nonspecific with attachment accomplished by cementing a portion of the tube to the chosen plants, principally algae. Typical habitats included pockets of sand and shell debris with a low level (≃30 cm) algal canopy. Although the adult sex ratio is near unity, the majority of solitary domicile inhabitants were males within intertidal and subtidal regions. Adult males with gravid females were the most common cohabitants in the intertidal area. Solitary juveniles were collected most frequently within the subtidal region where initial shell-searching is presumed to occur. Empty gastropod shells typically selected as domiciles were of the same species of gastropods sympatric on algae to which domiciles were attached. Over 80 per cent of all gastropod taxa selected for occupancy were generally in good condition (no broken apertures, spines, or shells with encrusting bryozoans) with natural colors and banding patterns apparent. Increased survivorship of P. conchicola due to reduced predation may result from appearing as an unpalatable, cryptic, or disruptively colored prey item.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
328
    328
  • Thumbnail: Page 
329
    329
  • Thumbnail: Page 
330
    330
  • Thumbnail: Page 
331
    331
  • Thumbnail: Page 
332
    332
  • Thumbnail: Page 
333
    333
  • Thumbnail: Page 
334
    334
  • Thumbnail: Page 
335
    335
  • Thumbnail: Page 
336
    336
  • Thumbnail: Page 
337
    337
  • Thumbnail: Page 
338
    338
  • Thumbnail: Page 
339
    339
  • Thumbnail: Page 
340
    340
  • Thumbnail: Page 
341
    341