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Mysid Locomotion and Feeding: Kinematics and Water-Flow Patterns of Antarctomysis sp., Acanthomysis sculpta, and Neomysis rayii

Mauricio Schabes and William Hamner
Journal of Crustacean Biology
Vol. 12, No. 1 (Feb., 1992), pp. 1-10
Published by: on behalf of The Crustacean Society
DOI: 10.2307/1548713
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1548713
Page Count: 10
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Mysid Locomotion and Feeding: Kinematics and Water-Flow Patterns of Antarctomysis sp., Acanthomysis sculpta, and Neomysis rayii
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Abstract

This study provides information on the kinematics and water currents generated by the swimming appendages of three mysidan species: Antarctomysis sp., Neomysis rayii, and Acanthomysis sculpta. From the kinematic analysis, we determined that the moving thoracic exopodites were spatially segregated along two axes, which reduced the interference between the ipsilateral swimming appendages. The posterior thoracic exopodites, particularly the three posteriormost appendages, varied the orientation of their paths, thereby influencing the trajectory of the exhalent stream. The predominant trajectory of the paired exhalent streams was in a ventroposterior direction, but the exhalent streams could adopt more pronounced dorsal or ventral directions relative to those more commonly observed. The fact that only one exhalent stream emerged from each side of the animal suggested that the exopodites were propelling water in a synergistic fashion. Cannon and Manton (1927) claimed that the elliptical motion of the exopodites produced both swimming currents and feeding currents, the so-called "axial currents" that flow medially between adjacent basipodites, joining together with an anteriorly directed current between the eighth pair of endopodites in the food groove to transport food to the mouth. Although we presented fine streams of fluorescein dye to tethered animals, we never observed lateral feeding currents or food groove currents. We concur with Depdolla (1923) and Attramadal (1981) that food enters the feeding basket only from the front.

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