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Use of Angiography to Outline the Cardiovascular Anatomy of the Sand Crab Portunus pelagicus Linnaeus

N. Gribble and K. Reynolds
Journal of Crustacean Biology
Vol. 13, No. 4 (Nov., 1993), pp. 627-637
Published by: on behalf of The Crustacean Society
DOI: 10.2307/1549093
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1549093
Page Count: 11
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Use of Angiography to Outline the Cardiovascular Anatomy of the Sand Crab Portunus pelagicus Linnaeus
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Abstract

A method for cardiac angiography of crustaceans is described which allows the pattern and volume of hemolymph flow to be observed in living animals. In Portunus pelagicus, 91% of hemolymph flow was via the sternal aorta into the ventral thoracic artery and into its radiating lateral subbranches which supply the walking legs. The ventricular wall (epicardium plus myocardium) appeared structurally complex and capable of taking up and retaining radioopaque dye, but the actual lumen of the ventricle appeared to be relatively small. A technique for quantifying stroke volume is outlined, which gave estimates that fall within reported values for similar crabs. Notes are included on the possible extension of the technique by the use of videodensitometry.

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