Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access JSTOR through your library or other institution:

login

Log in through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Epibiosis and Ornamental Cover Patterns of the Spider Crab Maja squinado on the Galician Coast, Northwestern Spain: Influence of Behavioral and Ecological Characteristics of the Host

L. Fernández, J. Parapar, E. González-Gurriarán and R. Muíño
Journal of Crustacean Biology
Vol. 18, No. 4 (Nov., 1998), pp. 728-737
Published by: Brill on behalf of The Crustacean Society
DOI: 10.2307/1549149
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1549149
Page Count: 10
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($34.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Epibiosis and Ornamental Cover Patterns of the Spider Crab Maja squinado on the Galician Coast, Northwestern Spain: Influence of Behavioral and Ecological Characteristics of the Host
Preview not available

Abstract

This paper examines the variation in the body-covering patterns of the spider crab Maja squinado in the Ría de Arousa (Galicia, northwestern Spain), as related to habitat, season, size, terminal molt, and migrations of the host. Individuals inhabiting shallow zones, generally characterized by their smaller size and more frequent molts (juveniles), showed a marked self-decorating behavior and a higher level of body covering than in adults inhabiting deeper areas. In adults, epibiosis was more common than self-decoration. The availability of material for decoration, primarily seaweeds, was greater in the spring and summer seasons, when the highest covering levels were reached. There was a negative correlation between the degree of covering and spider-crab size, with a decline in decorative behavior after the terminal molt. After the terminal molt, the animals migrate to deeper areas, where epibiosis is dominant, with a heightened presence of bryozoans, barnacles, and encrusting seaweeds, which require a stable substrate (absence of molts) in order to develop. In shallow zones, the erect seaweeds were dominant, occupying in many cases 100% of the body surface. In the deeper zones, the dorsal cephalothorax was the area with the greatest amount of cover. The legs were more sparsely covered and the ventral cephalothorax, affected only by epibiosis, was characterized by low levels of coverage.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
728
    728
  • Thumbnail: Page 
729
    729
  • Thumbnail: Page 
730
    730
  • Thumbnail: Page 
731
    731
  • Thumbnail: Page 
732
    732
  • Thumbnail: Page 
733
    733
  • Thumbnail: Page 
734
    734
  • Thumbnail: Page 
735
    735
  • Thumbnail: Page 
736
    736
  • Thumbnail: Page 
737
    737