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Rediscovery and Range extension of the Galápagos "Endemic" Pachycheles velerae (Decapoda: Anomura: Porcellanidae)

Alan W. Harvey
Journal of Crustacean Biology
Vol. 18, No. 4 (Nov., 1998), pp. 746-752
Published by: Brill on behalf of The Crustacean Society
DOI: 10.2307/1549151
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1549151
Page Count: 7
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Rediscovery and Range extension of the Galápagos "Endemic" Pachycheles velerae (Decapoda: Anomura: Porcellanidae)
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Abstract

Pachycheles velerae, formerly known only from an immature, recently molted female from the Galápagos Islands, is redescribed from additional material from Cocos Island, Costa Rica. This distinctive species is easily recognized by the strongly projecting teeth on the anterior margin of the cheliped carpus, the complex pattern of longitudinal and transverse ridges and granules on the dorsal surface of the cheliped carpus, the projecting, trilobate front, and setose pereiopods. A new morphological feature is described, an enlarged antennal membrane with a basal flap; though not previously reported, this structure appears to be present to varying degrees in other porcelain crabs. With the discovery of P. velerae from Cocos Island, the porcelain crab fauna of the Galápagos Islands loses its only strictly endemic taxon, but strengthens its already significant relationship to the porcellanid fauna of other eastern Pacific oceanic islands.

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