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Reciprocal Transplantation of Leg Tissue between Albino and Wild Crayfish Procambarus clarkii (Decapoda: Cambaridae)

Isamu Nakatani
Journal of Crustacean Biology
Vol. 20, No. 3 (Aug., 2000), pp. 453-459
Published by: on behalf of The Crustacean Society
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1549384
Page Count: 7
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Reciprocal Transplantation of Leg Tissue between Albino and Wild Crayfish Procambarus clarkii (Decapoda: Cambaridae)
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Abstract

To examine albinism, cheliped tissue was reciprocally transplanted into the autotomized stump of the walking leg (and vice versa) between albino and wild crayfish. Two of the 24 walking-leg stumps of albino crayfish formed a claw, and three of the 49 leg stumps of wild crayfish formed claws. Dactyl and pollex tissues of wild (and albino) crayfish were transplanted into an eyestalk stump and rostrum stump of 20 albino (and wild) crayfish, respectively. In albino crayfish, one normal claw and six abnormal chelipeds developed from the eyestalk stump, and seven abnormal chelipeds developed from the rostrum stump. In wild crayfish, one normal and seven abnormal chelipeds developed from the eyestalk stump, and four abnormal chelipeds developed from the rostrum stump. Dactyl tissue of wild (and albino) crayfish was inserted into the carapace near the eyestalk of 11 albino (and wild) crayfish. In six of each of the albino and wild crayfish, a dactyl-like structure developed from the graft. All of the regenerated structures were the same color as the host. These results suggest that the albinism in this crayfish is caused by a deficiency of some hormonal factor(s).

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