Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

The Functional Significance of Intersexes in the Intertidal Amphipod Corophium volutator

G. McCurdy, Mark R. Forbes, Sean P. Logan, Michael T. Kopec and Selma I. Mautner
Journal of Crustacean Biology
Vol. 24, No. 2 (May, 2004), pp. 261-265
Published by: Brill on behalf of The Crustacean Society
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1549908
Page Count: 5
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($34.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
The Functional Significance of Intersexes in the Intertidal Amphipod Corophium volutator
Preview not available

Abstract

We investigated the functional significance of intersexuality in the amphipod Corophium volutator, a key species in soft-bottom intertidal communities. Intersexes in this species possess morphological and anatomical characters of both males and females. Two broad types of intersexes were identified: those with nonsetose oostegites and two penial papillae (Type I), and those with setose oostegites and one or two penial papillae (Type II). We found little evidence that intersexes function as females, but some females housed experimentally with intersexes became ovigerous, indicating that intersexes can function as males. Females that mated with Type II intersexes produced smaller broods than those that mated with Type I intersexes or males, suggesting that this form of intersexuality may be costly to amphipods (most Type II intersexes possessed only a single testis). Male function of intersexes may be important in populations of C. volutator because males are frequently the limiting sex due to extremely female-biased sex ratios.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
261
    261
  • Thumbnail: Page 
262
    262
  • Thumbnail: Page 
263
    263
  • Thumbnail: Page 
264
    264
  • Thumbnail: Page 
265
    265