Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Movement of Sorted Stripes, the Cinder Cone, Garibaldi Park, B. C., Canada

J. Ross Mackay and W. H. Mathews
Arctic and Alpine Research
Vol. 6, No. 4 (Autumn, 1974), pp. 347-359
DOI: 10.2307/1550330
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1550330
Page Count: 13
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Movement of Sorted Stripes, the Cinder Cone, Garibaldi Park, B. C., Canada
Preview not available

Abstract

Field studies have been carried out on the movement of sorted stripes at The Cinder Cone area, Garibaldi Park, B. C., since 1958. The investigations were designed to separate, insofar as possible, the processes which, it was thought, might be important in the downslope movement of the sorted stripes, viz.: frost heave, displacement by needle ice, surface wash, and drag from snowcreep. Deep frost heave was found not to occur, surface wash proved unimportant, and the drag from snowcreep caused minimal differential transfer of fines versus coarse material. The principal downslope movement appears to be caused by the growth and ablation of needle ice. The progressive downslope shift results more from toppling of the needle ice columns with sliding and rolling of the superincumbent pebbles, than from vertical gravity settling. For the period 1958 to 1968, the coarser material moved, on the average, about 15 cm yr-1 and the finer material about 35 cm yr-1. The mass transport amounted to a "layer" of loose material, about 0.5 cm thick, moving downslope at about 25 cm yr-1.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
347
    347
  • Thumbnail: Page 
348
    348
  • Thumbnail: Page 
349
    349
  • Thumbnail: Page 
350
    350
  • Thumbnail: Page 
351
    351
  • Thumbnail: Page 
352
    352
  • Thumbnail: Page 
353
    353
  • Thumbnail: Page 
354
    354
  • Thumbnail: Page 
355
    355
  • Thumbnail: Page 
[356]
    [356]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
357
    357
  • Thumbnail: Page 
358
    358
  • Thumbnail: Page 
359
    359