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Assisted Revegetation in Denali National Park, Alaska, U.S.A.

R. V. Densmore and K. W. Holmes
Arctic and Alpine Research
Vol. 19, No. 4, Restoration and Vegetation Succession in Circumpolar Lands: Seventh Conference of the Comité Arctique International (Nov., 1987), pp. 544-548
DOI: 10.2307/1551423
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1551423
Page Count: 5
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Assisted Revegetation in Denali National Park, Alaska, U.S.A.
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Abstract

Proposed construction in Denali National Park will disturb alpine and subalpine vegetation. On some disturbed areas, plant succession is predicted to be slow and to produce a sparse plant cover. Studies are in progress to evaluate methods and native plant materials for assisted revegetation. Ten species which are important members of natural successional communities are currently being tested to determine if planting seedlings will increase their density and cover. Seeds were collected in the Park and greenhouse-propagated in containers. Treatment combinations of planted seedlings, fertilization, and watering are being tested at a disturbed alpine site, while treatment combinations of planted seedlings and topsoil addition are being tested at a subalpine disturbed site. In spite of exceptionally hot, dry weather, 96% of the planted seedlings at the alpine study site and 94% of the seedlings at the subalpine site were alive and growing after one growing season. Watering, fertilization, and topsoil treatments had little effect on first-year survival. These early results suggest that planting containerized seedlings may be an effective method to increase native plant cover on disturbed areas. However, revegetation treatments will be evaluated for several growing seasons to determine their effectiveness in increasing plant density and cover.

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