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Recent Cooling along the Southern Shore of Hudson Strait, Quebec, Canada, Documented from Permafrost Temperature Measurements

Michel Allard, Baolai Wang and Jean A. Pilon
Arctic and Alpine Research
Vol. 27, No. 2 (May, 1995), pp. 157-166
DOI: 10.2307/1551897
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1551897
Page Count: 10
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Recent Cooling along the Southern Shore of Hudson Strait, Quebec, Canada, Documented from Permafrost Temperature Measurements
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Abstract

Permafrost temperatures from the surface down to about 20 m from 10 boreholes distributed around three villages on the coast of Hudson Strait (Salluit, Kangiqsujuaq, and Quaqtaq) were recorded and analyzed for the period 1988-1993. The results indicate that the permafrost has been regularly cooling along the southern shore of Hudson Strait. The observed trend in the order of 0.05°C yr-1 at the 20-m depth is consistent with the long-term regional cooling observed in air temperatures. It also coincides with an increased rate of cooling since the mid-1980s, which has been interpreted in the literature as being related to recurrent changes in the thermohaline circulation in the Arctic and North Atlantic oceans. The weak variation observed in the active-layer thickness at the study sites leads to the conclusion that the climatic cooling takes place principally through longer and colder winters.

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