Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Late Quaternary Glacial and Environmental History of the Burstall Pass Area, Kananaskis Country, Alberta, Canada

Brandon D. Beierle, Derald G. Smith and Leonard V. Hills
Arctic, Antarctic, and Alpine Research
Vol. 35, No. 3 (Aug., 2003), pp. 391-398
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1552575
Page Count: 8
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Late Quaternary Glacial and Environmental History of the Burstall Pass Area, Kananaskis Country, Alberta, Canada
Preview not available

Abstract

We used integrated multiproxy analysis of a lake sediment core and glacial geomorphology to reconstruct the late Pleistocene and Holocene climate and geomorphic evolution of the Burstall Pass area, Kananaskis Country, Alberta, Canada. Analysis of macrofossils, pollen, sedimentology, and sediment geochemistry from a lake sediment core and geomorphology and tephrochronology of glacial moraines provide evidence for multiple modes of climate during the last ca. 11,000 yr. An advance of the Robertson Glacier prior to ca. 9200 14C BP is correlated to the Crowfoot advance and was the largest of the postglacial period. Immediately following this event, increased lake productivity and the deposition of marl as well as increased arboreal/nonarboreal pollen (AP/NAP) ratios suggest that the climate warmed, possibly accompanied by increased aridity. Decreased turbidity and clastic sediment flux in Lower Burstall Lake during the early Holocene suggest reduced glacial runoff and may indicate the complete ablation of the Robertson Glacier shortly after 10,000 14C BP. Clastic sediment flux to Lower Burstall Lake remained minimal until after ca. 3500 14C BP, when decreasing LOI (loss-on-ignition) organic carbon levels in lake sediments signaled the return of glacial runoff to the lake system. The largest Neoglacial advance in the Burstall Pass area appears to have been the most recent and was followed by rapid recession during the 20th century.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
391
    391
  • Thumbnail: Page 
392
    392
  • Thumbnail: Page 
393
    393
  • Thumbnail: Page 
394
    394
  • Thumbnail: Page 
395
    395
  • Thumbnail: Page 
396
    396
  • Thumbnail: Page 
397
    397
  • Thumbnail: Page 
398
    398