Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Dynamics of Common Wasps in New Zealand Beech Forests: A Model with Density Dependence and Weather

N. D. Barlow, J. R. Beggs and M. C. Barron
Journal of Animal Ecology
Vol. 71, No. 4 (Jul., 2002), pp. 663-671
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1555815
Page Count: 9
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($18.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Dynamics of Common Wasps in New Zealand Beech Forests: A Model with Density Dependence and Weather
Preview not available

Abstract

1. Nest densities of the common wasp (Vespula vulgaris (L.)) were monitored at six sites for 13 years in the honeydew-rich southern beech (Nothofagus spp.) forests of New Zealand's South Island. 2. Densities of wasp nests were among the highest in the world, up to 30 ha-1, and at any one site varied approximately twofold over the study period. 3. Strong but not overcompensating density dependence was identified, together with a negative effect of spring rainfall. 4. The density dependence appeared to act from the number of autumn queens produced during one year to the number of mature (autumn) nests the next year, rather than through variations in queen production per nest. The same stage was also responsible for most of the variability in autumn nest numbers from year to year, with queen production per nest contributing less. 5. Yearly changes in nest density could be summarized by a simple Ricker model including both density dependence and weather, thereby incorporating both previous hypotheses for the determination of wasp abundance.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[663]
    [663]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
664
    664
  • Thumbnail: Page 
665
    665
  • Thumbnail: Page 
666
    666
  • Thumbnail: Page 
667
    667
  • Thumbnail: Page 
668
    668
  • Thumbnail: Page 
669
    669
  • Thumbnail: Page 
670
    670
  • Thumbnail: Page 
671
    671