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What Do People Need to Know about Writing in Order to Write in Their Jobs?

Chris Davies and Maria Birbili
British Journal of Educational Studies
Vol. 48, No. 4 (Dec., 2000), pp. 429-445
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1555893
Page Count: 17
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What Do People Need to Know about Writing in Order to Write in Their Jobs?
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Abstract

This article considers the different kinds of learning that are appropriate for the rapidly expanding range of writing that constitutes an everyday part of most people's working lives. It discusses the importance and demands of everyday writing in work, and the role of formal education in preparing people for the localised learning about writing that is necessary upon entering work. It considers the issue of the transfer of knowledge, and argues that both metacognitive and conceptual understandings about writing are crucial elements in enabling people to transfer and adapt foundation literacy skills to the workplace.

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