Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Geographical and Ecological Notes on Cisandine to Platine Frogs

Bertha Lutz
Journal of Herpetology
Vol. 6, No. 2 (Jul. 31, 1972), pp. 83-100
DOI: 10.2307/1562799
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1562799
Page Count: 18
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Geographical and Ecological Notes on Cisandine to Platine Frogs
Preview not available

Abstract

From the point of view of the frog fauna, the great Eastern or Cisandine to Platine Subregion of South America, west of the Andes and north of Bahia Blanca, can be divided into 4 provinces. They correspond roughly to the 4 divisions proposed by Humboldt and by Martius (1840-1849): Hylaea (Naiiades), Continental Province (Oreades and Hamadryades), Platine--Cisplatine Province (Napeae) and Atlantic Province (Dryades). The Northern Hylaea and its known frogs are rather homogenous. The Continental Province can be subdivided into a Chaquean, a Northeastern and a Planaltine Subprovince. The Cisplatine--Platine Province whose southern limits are vague may be divided into Oriental and Mesopotamic Subprovinces. The Atlantic Province stretches along the southeastern and eastern coast. It comprises 4 life-zones: maritime scrub (Restinga), coastal lowlands (Baixada), montane rain-forest and alpine meadows (Hochstaudenwiesen). A fifth disjointed province might be formed by grouping together the different continental orographic systems, such as the Maritime Escarpment of Brazil and the inland parallel sierras, the mountains that separate the Brazilian shield from that of the Guianas, the ranges between Brazil and Venezuela and even the Andes. The Cisandine to Platine frog fauna is only partly generalized. It presents osteological specializations that seem like a reversal of evolution; it also shows caenogenetic innovations that give the impression of frustrated attempts to attain the direct development of the higher classes of vertebrates.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
83
    83
  • Thumbnail: Page 
84
    84
  • Thumbnail: Page 
85
    85
  • Thumbnail: Page 
86
    86
  • Thumbnail: Page 
87
    87
  • Thumbnail: Page 
88
    88
  • Thumbnail: Page 
89
    89
  • Thumbnail: Page 
90
    90
  • Thumbnail: Page 
91
    91
  • Thumbnail: Page 
92
    92
  • Thumbnail: Page 
93
    93
  • Thumbnail: Page 
94
    94
  • Thumbnail: Page 
95
    95
  • Thumbnail: Page 
96
    96
  • Thumbnail: Page 
97
    97
  • Thumbnail: Page 
98
    98
  • Thumbnail: Page 
99
    99
  • Thumbnail: Page 
100
    100