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Ecology of Australian Elapid Snakes of the Genera Furina and Glyphodon

Richard Shine
Journal of Herpetology
Vol. 15, No. 2 (Apr. 30, 1981), pp. 219-224
DOI: 10.2307/1563384
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1563384
Page Count: 6
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Abstract

The closely-related snake genera Furina and Glyphodon contain small to medium sized nocturnal species. Dissection of 472 specimens provided data on food habits, body sizes, clutch sizes, growth rates and seasonal schedules of reproduction. All 70 prey items recorded were scincid lizards; Furina species take small diurnal skinks (especially Lampropholis) whereas Glyphodon take larger skinks (especially Sphenomorphus). Females attain larger body sizes than males in Furina species. Clutch sizes average 3 to 4 in Furina, 6 to 10 in Glyphodon. Female reproductive cycles are strongly seasonal in temperate-zone Furina diadema, but aseasonal in tropical Furina. Both sexes of F. diadema attain sexual maturity in the year following their birth.

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