Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Lizard Home Ranges: Methodology and Functions

Barbara Rose
Journal of Herpetology
Vol. 16, No. 3 (Sep., 1982), pp. 253-269
DOI: 10.2307/1563718
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1563718
Page Count: 17
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Lizard Home Ranges: Methodology and Functions
Preview not available

Abstract

An evaluation of the methods for determining home ranges was made, and the factors affecting home range estimates were examined. Inadequate sample size and the use of statistically based models to correct for small sample size were the most common deficiencies in home range studies. The determinant and recapture radii methods unrealistically inflated home range estimates. The assumption of normality was not confirmed by actual data. The convex polygon method is the most attractive home range measurement to field biologists because it accurately describes the area used (if based on an adequate number of sightings), and it is simple, using only the actual sightings of an animal. By examining the relationship between number of sightings and cumulative home range size, the minimum number of sightings that accurately estimates home range can be empirically determined. Additionally, these data can provide information on the use of home ranges and territories. The time interval on which home ranges are based affect size estimates greatly. Many sightings per animal and short time intervals between censuses are necessary for accurate home range estimates. Eighteen was the minimum number of sightings to accurately measure home range size in Sceloporus virgatus. Eighteen is much larger than the minimum number commonly considered adequate. Few generalizations concerning home ranges are possible from the published data on North American iguanid lizards. The data indicate that caution is necessary in interpreting the function of home ranges from correlative data, and that the same data can support alternative hypotheses regarding function.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[253]
    [253]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
254
    254
  • Thumbnail: Page 
255
    255
  • Thumbnail: Page 
256
    256
  • Thumbnail: Page 
257
    257
  • Thumbnail: Page 
258
    258
  • Thumbnail: Page 
259
    259
  • Thumbnail: Page 
260
    260
  • Thumbnail: Page 
261
    261
  • Thumbnail: Page 
262
    262
  • Thumbnail: Page 
263
    263
  • Thumbnail: Page 
264
    264
  • Thumbnail: Page 
265
    265
  • Thumbnail: Page 
266
    266
  • Thumbnail: Page 
267
    267
  • Thumbnail: Page 
268
    268
  • Thumbnail: Page 
269
    269