Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Behavioral and Physiological Differentiation between the Color Morphs of the Salamander, Plethodon cinereus

Gabriel Moreno
Journal of Herpetology
Vol. 23, No. 4 (Dec., 1989), pp. 335-341
DOI: 10.2307/1564043
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1564043
Page Count: 7
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Behavioral and Physiological Differentiation between the Color Morphs of the Salamander, Plethodon cinereus
Preview not available

Abstract

It is postulated that fitness differences between the color morphs of the salamander Plethodon cinereus are produced through selection on correlated characters and that character covariation plays an important role in the maintenance of the color polymorphism. A difference in temperature-dependent foraging behavior of the morphs was detected as a correlation between temperature and morph frequency on the ground surface at two sites near Princeton, New Jersey. The standard metabolic rate of the morphs differs at 15°C, at which the morphs' behavior is most dissimilar. Age specific morph frequencies suggest that the striped morph suffers higher mortality in a warm locality whereas higher mortality of the black morph has been reported from other, colder, localities. These results, along with previous studies strongly support the hypothesis that the maintenance of this polymorphism is associated with fitness differences produced by temperature-related selection on characters correlated with coloration, namely metabolic rate and foraging behavior. The proportions of autotomized tails in the black and striped morphs in the study site were 21% and 4%, respectively, perhaps indicating higher predation on the black morph in this population. A previous hypothesis of protective coloration of the black morph is rejected on the basis of age-specific mortality and tail autotomy data.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
335
    335
  • Thumbnail: Page 
336
    336
  • Thumbnail: Page 
337
    337
  • Thumbnail: Page 
338
    338
  • Thumbnail: Page 
339
    339
  • Thumbnail: Page 
340
    340
  • Thumbnail: Page 
341
    341