Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Fire and a Tallgrass Prairie Reptile Community: Effects on Relative Abundance and Seasonal Activity

John F. Cavitt
Journal of Herpetology
Vol. 34, No. 1 (Mar., 2000), pp. 12-20
DOI: 10.2307/1565233
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1565233
Page Count: 9
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Fire and a Tallgrass Prairie Reptile Community: Effects on Relative Abundance and Seasonal Activity
Preview not available

Abstract

Few intensive studies have been conducted on reptile populations of the tallgrass prairie. In addition, the effects of fire on these populations are also largely unknown. I established drift fence arrays connected to funnel traps to study the community composition and seasonal activity of reptiles found on the Konza Prairie Research Natural Area located near Manhattan, Kansas. This design also gave me the opportunity to examine the response of reptile populations to a spring wildfire. A total of 657 individuals representing 12 species were captured from 1994-1996. The results suggest that one species, Coluber constrictor, may respond negatively to recent fire.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
12
    12
  • Thumbnail: Page 
13
    13
  • Thumbnail: Page 
14
    14
  • Thumbnail: Page 
15
    15
  • Thumbnail: Page 
16
    16
  • Thumbnail: Page 
17
    17
  • Thumbnail: Page 
18
    18
  • Thumbnail: Page 
19
    19
  • Thumbnail: Page 
20
    20