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Age Distribution and Longevity in the Ramsey Canyon Leopard Frog, Rana subaquavocalis

J. E. Platz, A. Lathrop, L. Hofbauer and M. Vradenburg
Journal of Herpetology
Vol. 31, No. 4 (Dec., 1997), pp. 552-557
DOI: 10.2307/1565608
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1565608
Page Count: 6
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Age Distribution and Longevity in the Ramsey Canyon Leopard Frog, Rana subaquavocalis
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Abstract

Phalangeal elements from 80 individuals from two populations of the Ramsey Canyon leopard frog, Rana subaquavocalis, were sectioned, stained and then examined to estimate individual ages and to determine population age structure and growth curves. Large adults from the Ramsey Canyon population exceeded 100 mm in body length and had as many as 10 resting lines indicating that they were 11 years postmetamorphosis. In contrast the majority of the 38 specimens from the Barchas Ranch population were small, under 70 mm in body length, and were five or less years old. Growth curves for both populations were constructed based on body size and the number of resting lines in bone sections. Growth rates for males in the Ramsey Canyon population are lower than females. The population age structure revealed in this study has implications to conservation efforts. Our findings suggest that the Ramsey Canyon population was composed largely of reproductive and very old reproductive individuals whereas at the time of analysis the Barchas Ranch population was larger and contained mostly prereproductive individuals.

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