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Parasitism by Helminths in Eurolophosaurus nanuzae (Lacertilia: Tropiduridae) in an Area of Rocky Outcrops in Minas Gerais State, Southeastern Brazil

Angélica F. Fontes, Joaquim J. Vicente, Mara C. Kiefer and Monique Van Sluys
Journal of Herpetology
Vol. 37, No. 4 (Dec., 2003), pp. 736-741
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1565879
Page Count: 6
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Parasitism by Helminths in Eurolophosaurus nanuzae (Lacertilia: Tropiduridae) in an Area of Rocky Outcrops in Minas Gerais State, Southeastern Brazil
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Abstract

We studied the helminth fauna of the digestive tract of the lizard, Eurolophosaurus nanuzae, from the Serra do Cipó, Minas Gerais State, Brazil and tested for sexual, ontogenetic, and seasonal differences in prevalence (proportion of infected individuals) and intensity of infection (number of parasites per host). We also analyzed the distribution patterns of the helminths along the digestive tract of E. nanuzae. We found the nematodes Physaloptera lutzi, Subulura lacertilia, Parapharyngodon sceleratus, and Strongyluris oscari and the cestode Oochoristica vanzolinii. Males and females differed in prevalence for P. lutzi, S. lacertilian, and O. vanzolinii. None of the helminth species differed in intensity of infection between sexes. Prevalence was significantly higher in adults than in juveniles for P. lutzi and S. lacertila; however, this difference was not observed for P. sceleratus. Only adults were infected by S. oscari and O. vanzolinii. Intensity of infection increased with lizard body size for P. lutzi, S. lacertilian, and S. oscari but not for P. sceleratus and O. vanzolinii. Only P. lutzi differed in prevalence between seasons, with lizards being more parasitized during the wet season. Physaloptera lutzi and S. lacertilia differed in infection intensity between seasons. For both species the mean intensity of infection was higher in the dry season than in the wet season. Physaloptera lutzi used the stomach and the other helminths used the intestines.

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