Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

On the Artist and Science

Gwyneth Thurgood
Leonardo
Vol. 4, No. 2 (Spring, 1971), pp. 117-124
Published by: The MIT Press
DOI: 10.2307/1572185
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1572185
Page Count: 9
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($19.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
On the Artist and Science
Preview not available

Abstract

The author reviews some influences of geometry, and of scientific and technological inventions upon the visual artist. Special reference is made to the images produced by the camera and the microscope. The parallels that have been observed between the content of many paintings of the abstract kind and patterns revealed by microscopy, crystallography and metallography are noted. She does not believe that these parallels in any way reduce the significance of such works of art. She concludes by making a plea for people to reassess their value judgements of art when they encounter new idioms that artists devise in response to the environment to which they are exposed. /// L'auteur passe en revue quelques unes des influences que la géométrie et les inventions scientifiques et technologiques ont sur la vision de l'artiste. En particulier, il est fait référence aux images produites par la caméra et le microscope. On a souvent mentionné le parallélisme entre le contenu de nombreuses peintures abstraites et les formes révélées par la microscopie, la cristallographie et la métallographie. L'auteur ne croit pas que ce parallélisme réduise d'aucune façon la signification de telles œuvres d'art. Elle conclut en formulant le vœu que le public réajuste ses jugements de valeur sur l'art quand il rencontre le langage nouveau que les artistes formulent en réponse à l'environnement auquel ils sont exposés.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
117
    117
  • Thumbnail: Page 
118
    118
  • Thumbnail: Page 
119
    119
  • Thumbnail: Page 
120
    120
  • Thumbnail: Page 
[unnumbered]
    [unnumbered]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
121
    121
  • Thumbnail: Page 
122
    122
  • Thumbnail: Page 
123
    123
  • Thumbnail: Page 
124
    124