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Cézanne and the Average Effect of Foreshortening on Shape

Kenneth R. Adams
Leonardo
Vol. 8, No. 1 (Winter, 1975), pp. 21-25
Published by: The MIT Press
DOI: 10.2307/1573183
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1573183
Page Count: 5
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Abstract

Curves are either flattened or sharpened when they are foreshortened in perspective. The two kinds of foreshortening seem to be perceived differently. The author argues that in some respects we see the world flatter than it is, and that, for example, Cézanne's and Mondrian's figurative paintings reflect this fact.

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