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The Ecology of J. J. Gibson's Perception

E. Bruce Goldstein
Leonardo
Vol. 14, No. 3 (Summer, 1981), pp. 191-195
Published by: The MIT Press
DOI: 10.2307/1574269
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1574269
Page Count: 5
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The Ecology of J. J. Gibson's Perception
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Abstract

J. J. Gibson's approach to the study of perception emphasizes the way an active observer picks up information from the environment. The central postulates of Gibson's approach are that (1) visual space is defined by information (such as texture gradients) contained on environmental surfaces, (2) the crucial information for perception is information that remains invariant as an observer moves through the environment, and (3) this invariant information is picked up directly, so that no intervening mental processes are necessary for visual perception. This paper summarizes Gibson's approach as it is stated in his three books, "Perception of the Visual World" (1950). "The Senses Considered as Perceptual Systems" (1966) and "The Ecological Approach to Visual Perception" (1979) and evaluates the final form of his approach described in his third, and last, book.

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