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Industrial Design: On Its Characteristics and Relationships to the Visual Fine Arts

Curtis L. Carter
Leonardo
Vol. 14, No. 4 (Autumn, 1981), pp. 283-289
Published by: The MIT Press
DOI: 10.2307/1574602
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1574602
Page Count: 7
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Abstract

Industrial design and the visual arts share a common aesthetic basis as demonstrated by their common use of aesthetic principles and by designers who are also visual artists. The author examines the rationale for exhibiting industrial products in art museums and the similarities and differences between industrial design and the fine arts. He argues that industrial design shares important theoretical concepts (expression, representation and style) with the visual fine arts.

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