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Causality: Ruin Time and Ruins

Florence M. Hetzler
Leonardo
Vol. 21, No. 1 (1988), pp. 51-55
Published by: The MIT Press
DOI: 10.2307/1578416
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1578416
Page Count: 5
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Abstract

A ruin is defined as the disjunctive product of the intrusion of nature upon an edifice without loss of the unity produced by the human builders. Ruin time, proposed as the principal cause of ruin, serves also to unify the ruin. In a ruin the edifice, the human-made part, and nature are one and inseparable; an edifice separated from its natural setting is no longer part of a ruin since it has lost its time, space and place. A ruin has a signification different from something merely human-made. It is like no other work of art and its time is unlike any other time.

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