Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Remembering Obligation: Pedagogy and the Witnessing of Testimony of Historical Trauma

Roger I. Simon and Claudia Eppert
Canadian Journal of Education / Revue canadienne de l'éducation
Vol. 22, No. 2 (Spring, 1997), pp. 175-191
DOI: 10.2307/1585906
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1585906
Page Count: 17
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($9.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Remembering Obligation: Pedagogy and the Witnessing of Testimony of Historical Trauma
Preview not available

Abstract

It is often assumed that history becomes meaningful when seen through the lens of personal experience. We examine the ethical obligations in witnessing testimony that conveys aspects of a traumatic "lived past." We discuss two different modes of attending to testimony and illustrate the tensions between them in reference to testimony about the Nazi genocide of European Jewry. We consider the possibilities for nurturing and supporting an ethical practice of witnessing in the context of informal and school-based communities of memory, and develop a principled basis for retelling or passing on what has been heard. This work is informed by our extended study of forms of commemoration that enable the remembrance of genocide, colonialism, and slavery in a way that traces and supports the potential transformation of the social grammar of violence inherent in such realities. /// On suppose souvent que l'histoire prend un sens lorsqu'elle est perçue à travers l'expérience personnelle. Les auteurs analysent les obligations éthiques des personnes qui recueillent des témoignages au sujet de traumatismes vécus dans le passé. Ils discutent de deux façons de recueillir ces témoignages et illustrent les tensions entre ces méthodes dans le cas de témoignages portant sur le génocide des Juifs par les Nazis. Les auteurs se penchent sur la possibilité de favoriser le recours à une méthode éthique de recueil de témoignages dans des contextes informels ou des groupes scolaires et élaborent des principes pour redire et transmettre ce qui a été dit. Cette recherche repose sur l'étude exhaustive qu'ont effectuée les auteurs sur les formes de commémoration qui permettent le rappel des génocides, du colonialisme et de l'esclavage d'une manière qui retrace et favorise la transformation potentielle de la grammaire sociale de la violence inhérente à ce genre de réalités.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
175
    175
  • Thumbnail: Page 
176
    176
  • Thumbnail: Page 
177
    177
  • Thumbnail: Page 
178
    178
  • Thumbnail: Page 
179
    179
  • Thumbnail: Page 
180
    180
  • Thumbnail: Page 
181
    181
  • Thumbnail: Page 
182
    182
  • Thumbnail: Page 
183
    183
  • Thumbnail: Page 
184
    184
  • Thumbnail: Page 
185
    185
  • Thumbnail: Page 
186
    186
  • Thumbnail: Page 
187
    187
  • Thumbnail: Page 
188
    188
  • Thumbnail: Page 
189
    189
  • Thumbnail: Page 
190
    190
  • Thumbnail: Page 
191
    191