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Localization of Salmonellae within the Intestinal Tract of Chickens

M. J. Fanelli, W. W. Sadler, C. E. Franti and J. R. Brownell
Avian Diseases
Vol. 15, No. 2 (Apr. - Jun., 1971), pp. 366-375
DOI: 10.2307/1588708
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1588708
Page Count: 10
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Localization of Salmonellae within the Intestinal Tract of Chickens
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Abstract

Shed pattern was studied in 4-week-old straight-run New Hampshire chickens inoculated orally with 108 salmonellae of two species, S. typhimurium and S. infantis. Birds were sampled by cloacal swab at 0, 1, 2, 3, 6, 9, 13 and 17 days postinoculation. Also, on each sample day material from 12 different areas of the intestinal tract of at least five birds was cultured for salmonellae. Results from 252 birds indicate that cecal contents provide the best evidence of salmonellae in the intestinal tract. On the basis of recovery from one or more portions of the intestinal tract, 182 of the 222 birds inoculated and subsequently necropsied were positive. Of these, 72 (39.6%) were positive by cloacal swab taken just prior to necropsy, 85 (46.7%) by cecal tonsil culture, 106 (58.2%) by cloacal-contents culture, and 155 (85.2%) by cecal-contents culture. There were no significant differences in localization between the two species of Salmonella. Repeated cloacal swabs indicated that birds positive for salmonellae on both the first and second days postinoculation remained positive longer than birds positive on only one of those days. Birds negative by cloacal swab on those first two days tended to remain negative during the entire experiment.

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