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Psittacine Pox Virus: Virus Isolation and Identification, Transmission, and Cross-Challenge Studies in Parrots and Chickens

T. R. Boosinger, R. W. Winterfield, D. S. Feldman and A. S. Dhillon
Avian Diseases
Vol. 26, No. 2 (Apr. - Jun., 1982), pp. 437-444
DOI: 10.2307/1590119
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1590119
Page Count: 8
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Psittacine Pox Virus: Virus Isolation and Identification, Transmission, and Cross-Challenge Studies in Parrots and Chickens
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Abstract

An avian pox virus was isolated from Amazon parrots dying with severe diphtheritic oral, esophageal, and crop lesions. The virus was propagated on chorioallantoic membranes (CAM) of 10-day-old chicken embryos, and a homogenate of the infected CAM was rubbed vigorously onto the conjunctiva, oral mucosa, and defeathered follicles of two healthy Amazon parrots and three conures. All experimental birds developed cutaneous and ocular pox lesions, and one parrot developed oral pox lesions. Specific-pathogen-free chicks inoculated with the virus isolate developed skin lesions identical to those of the parrots. Chickens vaccinated with fowl and pigeon pox vaccines and inoculated with the psittacine isolate developed lesions typical of avian pox. Chickens vaccinated with the psittacine virus were susceptible to fowl and pigeon pox virus infection. This pox virus isolate may thus be regarded as a potential pathogen for chickens.

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