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Wildlife Surveillance Associated with an Outbreak of Lethal H5N2 Avian Influenza in Domestic Poultry

Victor F. Nettles, John M. Wood and Robert G. Webster
Avian Diseases
Vol. 29, No. 3 (Jul. - Sep., 1985), pp. 733-741
DOI: 10.2307/1590665
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1590665
Page Count: 9
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Wildlife Surveillance Associated with an Outbreak of Lethal H5N2 Avian Influenza in Domestic Poultry
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Abstract

Wildlife surveillance was conducted for influenza viruses in conjunction with the 1983-84 lethal H5N2 avian influenza epizootic in domestic poultry in Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Maryland, and Virginia. Virus-isolation attempts made on cloacal and tracheal swabs from 4,466 birds and small rodents within the quarantined areas and 1,511 waterfowl in nearby Maryland yielded only a single H5N2 isolate from a pen-raised chukar in Pennsylvania. Antibodies against hemagglutinin type 5 and/or neuraminidase type 2 were found in 33% of the aquatic birds tested; however, this finding could not be used to confirm previous H5N2 avian influenza virus activity because of the possibility of prior infections with multiple influenza subtypes. The low prevalence of lethal H5N2 avian influenza virus in wild birds and small rodents strongly indicated that these animals were not responsible for dissemination of the disease among poultry farms during the outbreak. /// Se llevaron a cabo estudios de vigilancia epidemiológica para la detección del virus de influenza. Estos estudios se realizaron durante la epizootia de influenza causada por la cepa altamente patógena H5N2, ocurrida entre 1983 y 1984 en aves domésticas en los estados de Pensilvania, Nueva Jersey, Maryland y Virginia. Se realizaron estudios de aislamiento de virus a partir de hisopos traqueales y cloacales de 4.466 aves y pequeños roedores localizados dentro de las áreas cuarentenadas, así como a partir de 1.511 aves acuáticas localizadas en el estado de Maryland. Solamente se logró un aislamiento del virus H5N2 a partir de un ave silvestre criada en confinamiento en Pensilvania. En un 33% de las aves acuáticas estudiadas, se encontraron anticuerpos contra la hemoaglutinina tipo 5 y/o la neuraminidasa tipo 2, sin embargo, este hallazgo no puede confirmar la exposición de estas aves con el virus H5N2 puesto que existe la posibilidad de infecciones previas con una variedad de tipos diferentes de virus de influenza. La baja prevalencia de la cepa letal H5N2 de influenza en aves silvestres y roedores indica que estos animales no estuvieron involucrados en la diseminación de la enfermedad durante los brotes ocurridos en granjas de aves domésticas.

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