Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Pathologic Changes in Pigeons Infected with a Virulent Trichomonas gallinae Strain (Eiberg)

E. M. Narcisi, M. Sevoian and B. M. Honigberg
Avian Diseases
Vol. 35, No. 1 (Jan. - Mar., 1991), pp. 55-61
DOI: 10.2307/1591295
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1591295
Page Count: 7
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($12.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Preview not available

Abstract

Trichomonas gallinae, Eiberg strain, is a virulent hepatotropic flagellate parasite of pigeons. The parasite initially infects the upper digestive tract, causing the formation of ulcers, which allow it to enter the circulatory system. The trichomonads later gain access to the liver, where they cause the formation of caseous lesions. Vascular congestion and perivascular cuffing in the liver were seen as early as 4 days postinfection (PI). By day 7 PI, a marked reduction in abdominal fat and hepatosplenomegaly was evident. Hepatocytes underwent fatty degeneration (seen by day 7 PI) before total necrosis set in. On day 8 PI, trichomonads could be found among the necrotic hepatocytes in caseous lesions. These lesions were delineated by a wall of leukocytes and occasional giant cells. Nonimmune pigeons died within 14 to 17 days PI of liver dysfunction. Other organs (kidney and genitalia) were also seen to undergo degeneration. These manifestations probably reflect the progression of liver dysfunction. /// La cepa Eiberg de Trichomonas gallinae es un parásito flagelado, virulento y hepatotrópico de las palomas. El parásito infecta inicialmente el tracto digestivo superior, induciendo la formación de úlceras, las que permiten su introducción al torrente circulatorio. Posteriormente, las tricomonas penetran al hígado donde provocan la formación de lesiones caseosas. Se observó congestión e infiltración perivascular en el hígado a los cuatro días postinfección. A los siete días postinfección fue evidente una marcada reducción de la cantidad de grasa abdominal y presencia de hepatoesplenomegalia. Los hepatocitos mostraron degeneración lipídica (observada a los siete días postinoculación), antes de manifestarse una necrosis total. A los ocho días postinoculación fue posible encontrar las tricomonas en los hepatocitos necróticos de las lesiones caseosas. Estas lesiones estuvieron rodeadas por una pared de leucocitos y ocasionalmente por algunas células gigantes. Las palomas no inmunes murieron entre los días 14 y 17 postinoculación debido a la disfunción hepática. Otros órganos (riñones y genitales) también mostraron degeneración. Estas manifestaciones probablemente reflejan la secuencia del desarrollo de la disfunción hepática.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
55
    55
  • Thumbnail: Page 
56
    56
  • Thumbnail: Page 
57
    57
  • Thumbnail: Page 
58
    58
  • Thumbnail: Page 
59
    59
  • Thumbnail: Page 
60
    60
  • Thumbnail: Page 
61
    61