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Avian Influenza Viruses from Migratory and Resident Ducks of Coastal Louisiana

D. E. Stallknecht, S. M. Shane, P. J. Zwank, D. A. Senne and M. T. Kearney
Avian Diseases
Vol. 34, No. 2 (Apr. - Jun., 1990), pp. 398-405
DOI: 10.2307/1591427
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1591427
Page Count: 8
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Avian Influenza Viruses from Migratory and Resident Ducks of Coastal Louisiana
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Abstract

Cloacal and tracheal swabs were collected from 1389 hunter-killed ducks in Cameron Parish, Louisiana, during the 1986 and 1987 waterfowl seasons. Twenty-eight avian influenza viruses (AIVs) were isolated from 605 blue-winged teal (Anas discors), 75 mottled ducks (A. fulvigula), 375 gadwalls (A. strepera) and 334 green-winged teal (A. crecca). Prevalence estimates of AIV in ducks sampled during September, November, and December through January were 3.1%, 2.0%, and 0.4%, respectively. Differences in prevalence were detected by season (P = 0.044) and age class (P = 0.036). Two isolations from resident mottled ducks document transmission of AIV on these wintering areas. Much subtype diversity was present, with nine of 13 hemagglutinin (HA) and nine of nine neuraminidase (NA) subtypes recovered. Predominant HA and NA subtypes were typical of AIVs commonly associated with waterfowl. Results indicate that AIVs are transmitted in the wintering areas, and, although prevalence is low, these viruses continue to circulate within these duck populations during winter. /// Durante la temporada de caza de aves acuáticas de los años 1986 y 1987, se tomaron hisopos de tráqueas y de cloacas a partir de 1389 patos cazados en la región de Cameron, Louisiana, E.U.A. Se aislaron 28 cepas del virus de influenza aviar provenientes de 605 barraquetes o cercetas aliazules (Anas discors), 75 patos moteados (A. fulvigula), 375 A. strepera y 334 barraquetes o cercetas aliverdes (A. crecca). Los cálculos de prevalencia del virus de influenza aviar en patos muestreados durante Septiembre, Noviembre, y Diciembre hasta Enero fueron 3.1%, 2.0% y 0.4%, respectivamente. Se detectaron diferencias en prevalencia en la temporada (P = 0.044) y edad (P = 0.036). Dos aislamientos a partir de patos moteados residentes documentaron la transmisión del virus de influenza en estas áreas. Se observó una gran diversidad de subtipos, aislándose 9 de los 13 subtipos de hemoaglutinina y todos los 9 subtipos de neuraminidasa. Los subtipos predominantes de hemoaglutinina y neuraminidasa fueron típicos de virus de influenza aviar aislado de aves acuáticas. Los resultados indican que el virus de influenza aviar puede transmitirse en las áreas de migración y, aunque la prevalencia es baja, estos virus continúan circulando en las poblaciones de patos durante la estación de invierno.

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