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Microbiological and Histopathological Effects of an Induced-Molt Fasting Procedure on a Salmonella enteritidis Infection in Chickens

Peter S. Holt and Robert E. Porter, Jr.
Avian Diseases
Vol. 36, No. 3 (Jul. - Sep., 1992), pp. 610-618
DOI: 10.2307/1591755
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1591755
Page Count: 9
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Microbiological and Histopathological Effects of an Induced-Molt Fasting Procedure on a Salmonella enteritidis Infection in Chickens
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Abstract

A study was undertaken to determine if a 2-week feed-removal protocol, as is used by industry to induce a molt in aging hens, would affect the course of a Salmonella enteritidis infection. White leghorn hens aged 69-84 weeks were deprived of feed to induce a molt, and on day 4 of the fast, the birds were orally infected with 5 × 106 S. enteritidis. S. enteritidis organisms were enumerated in the spleen on day 6 and from the alimentary tract on days 7, 14, 21, 28, and 35. Little difference was detected in numbers of S. enteritidis from spleens of molted and unmolted hens. Significantly more molted hens shed detectable intestinal S. enteritidis than unmolted hens on day 14 (one of two trials) and day 21 (one of two trials). Intestinal levels of S. enteritidis were increased 100- to 1000-fold in the molted birds on day 7 (one of two trials) and day 14 (two of two trials), and many of the hens exhibited bloody alimentary secretions. Histological examination of the intestinal tract of S. enteritidis-infected molted hens showed increased inflammation in the epithelium and lamina propria of colons and ceca, compared with unmolted infected hens. /// Se llevó a cabo un estudio para determinar si el sistema usado por la industria avícola de suprimir el alimento durante dos semanas para inducir una muda forzada, podría afectar el curso de la infección con Salmonella enteritidis. A gallinas leghorn blancas de 69-84 semanas se les suprimió el alimento para inducir la muda forzada. Al día cuatro del ayuno, las aves se infectaron oralmente con una dosis de 5 × 106 de S. enteritidis. Al día seis se cuantificó la S. enteritidis presente en el bazo y a los días 7, 14, 21, 28 y 35 se cuantificó la presente en el tracto digestivo. Se detectaron pequeñas diferencias en el número de S. enteritidis presentes en el bazo de las gallinas mudadas y no mudadas. En uno de dos experimentos, al día 14 y 21, las gallinas mudadas eliminaron un número significantemente mayor de S. enteritidis del intestino que las gallinas no mudadas. En uno de dos experimentos, durante el día 7 y al día 14, los niveles de S. enteritidis en el intestino se incrementaron entre 100 a 1000 veces más en las aves mudadas, y la mayoría de las aves mostraron secreciones alimentarias sanguinolentas. El examen histopatológico del tracto intestinal de las gallinas mudadas infectadas con S. enteritidis mostró una inflamación en el epitelio y de la lámina propia del colon y del ciego, comparadas con las aves no mudadas.

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