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Journal Article

Effect of Inv Mutations on Salmonella Virulence and Colonization in 1-Day-Old White Leghorn Chicks

Susan B. Porter and Roy Curtiss, III
Avian Diseases
Vol. 41, No. 1 (Jan. - Mar., 1997), pp. 45-57
DOI: 10.2307/1592442
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1592442
Page Count: 13
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Effect of Inv Mutations on Salmonella Virulence and Colonization in 1-Day-Old White Leghorn Chicks
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Abstract

Invasion of Salmonella into the cells of the intestinal epithelium is an important step in the infection process. This initial invasion is followed by colonization of other organs throughout the body. In an attempt to better understand this process, we moved defined mutations in several genes of the inv locus into Salmonella typhimurium UK-1 and two strains of Salmonella enteritidis. These mutant strains were evaluated for their oral and intraperitoneal virulence as determined by 50% lethal dose in 1-day-old white leghorn chicks. These inv mutants were also studied for their ability to colonize orally infected chicks. The invA, invB, and invC mutations all caused a reduction in oral virulence and colonization by UK-1 and the S. enteritidis strains. Mutation of the invH gene had little or no effect on oral virulence or colonization. None of the inv genes tested had any effect on virulence of these Salmonella strains when administered intraperitoneally. /// La invasión de Salmonella en las células del epitelio intestinal es un paso importante en el proceso de infección. Esta invasión inicial va seguida por la colonización de otros órganos. Para tratar de entender mejor este proceso, movimos mutaciones definidas en varios genes del locus inv a la cepa UK-1 de Salmonella typhimurium y dos cepas de Salmonella enteritidis. La virulencia de estas cepas mutantes se evaluó mediante la dosis letal 50 para pollitos leghorn blancos de 1 día de edad inoculados por las vías oral e intraperitoneal. Estas mutantes inv también se estudiaron por su capacidad de colonizar pollitos infectados por la vía oral. Las mutaciones invA, invB e invC causaron una reducción en la virulencia oral y en la colonización por la cepa UK-1 y por las cepas de S. enteritidis. La mutación del gen invH tuvo poco o ningún efecto en la virulencia oral o en la colonización. Ninguno de los genes inv estudiados tuvo ningún efecto sobre la virulencia de estas cepas de Salmonella cuando se administraron intraperitonealmente.

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