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Inflammation of the Bronchi in Broiler Chickens, Associated with Barn Dust and the Influence of Barn Temperature

C. Riddell, K. Schwean and H. L. Classen
Avian Diseases
Vol. 42, No. 2 (Apr. - Jun., 1998), pp. 225-229
DOI: 10.2307/1592471
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1592471
Page Count: 5
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Inflammation of the Bronchi in Broiler Chickens, Associated with Barn Dust and the Influence of Barn Temperature
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Abstract

Broiler chickens were raised in separate rooms kept at temperatures of either 27 C or 16 C from 28 through 39 days of age. At the high temperature mouth breathing was recorded, but it was absent at the lower temperature. The number of dust particles in the air was greater in the warm rooms. More than 50% of the chickens in warm rooms had microscopic lesions in the bronchi of their lungs, whereas fewer than 5% of chickens in cold rooms had such lesions. Large dust particles were visible in some of the lesions. It was postulated that the increased incidence of lung lesions in chickens from warm rooms was due to mouth breathing rather than the higher dust levels in the air of these rooms. /// Pollos de engorde fueron criados en cuartos separados mantenidos a temperaturas de 27 C o 16 C desde los 28 hasta los 39 días de edad. Bajo las temperaturas altas se observó respiración bucal. El número de partículas de polvo fue mayor en los cuartos más calientes. Más del 50% de los pollos en los cuartos calientes mostraron lesiones microscópicas en los pulmones, mientras que menos del 5% de los pollos en los cuartos fríos tuvieron estas lesiones. Se observaron grandes partículas de polvo en algunas de las lesiones. Se postula que el aumento en la incidencia de las lesiones pulmonares en los pollos de los cuartos calientes fue debido a la respiración bucal y no a los altos niveles de partículas presentes en el aire en estos cuartos.

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