Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support

Role of Campylobacter jejuni Potential Virulence Genes in Cecal Colonization

Richard L. Ziprin, Colin R. Young, J. Allen Byrd, Larry H. Stanker, Michael E. Hume, Sean A. Gray, Bong J. Kim and Michael E. Konkel
Avian Diseases
Vol. 45, No. 3 (Jul. - Sep., 2001), pp. 549-557
DOI: 10.2307/1592894
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1592894
Page Count: 9
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($12.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support
Role of Campylobacter jejuni Potential Virulence Genes in Cecal Colonization
Preview not available

Abstract

Campylobacter jejuni, a common commensal in chickens, is one of the leading causes of bacterial gastroenteritis in humans worldwide. The aims of this investigation were twofold. First, we sought to determine whether mutations of the C. jejuni ciaB and pldA virulence-associated genes impaired the organism's ability to colonize chickens. Second, we sought to determine if inoculation of chicks with C. jejuni mutants could confer protection from subsequent challenge with the C. jejuni wild-type strain. The C. jejuni ciaB gene encodes a secreted protein necessary for the maximal invasion of C. jejuni into cultured epithelial cells, and the pldA gene encodes a protein with phospholipase activity. Also included in this study were two additional C. jejuni mutants, one harboring a mutation in cadF and the other in dnaJ, with which we have previously performed colonization studies. In contrast to results with the parental C. jejuni strain, viable organisms were not recovered from any of the chicks inoculated with the C. jejuni mutants. To determine if chicks inoculated with the C. jejuni mutants become resistant to colonization by the C. jejuni parental strain upon subsequent challenge, chicks were inoculated either intraperitoneally (i.p.) or both orally and i.p. with the C. jejuni mutants. Inoculated birds were then orally challenged with the parental strain. Inoculation with the C. jejuni mutants did not provide protection from subsequent challenge with the wild-type strain. In addition, neither the C. jejuni parental nor the mutant strains caused any apparent morbidity or mortality of the chicks. We conclude that mutations in genes cadF, dnaJ, pldA, and ciaB impair the ability of C. jejuni to colonize the cecum, that chicks tolerate massive inoculation with these mutant strains, and that such inoculations do not provide biologically significant protection against colonization by the parental strain. /// El Campylobacter jejuni, una bacteria comensal común de las aves domésticas, es uno de los principales causantes de gastroenteritis bacteriana en humanos a nivel mundial. El presente estudio tiene dos objetivos principales: primero, determinar si mutaciones en los genes C. jejuni ciaB y pldA, normalmente asociados con factores de virulencia de la bacteria, son capaces de eliminar la capacidad del microorganismo de colonizar el tracto intestinal de las aves. Segundo, determinar si el uso de inóculos de las cepas mutantes de C. jejuni proporciona protección contra el desafío con cepas de campo de la bacteria. El gen ciaB del C. jejuni codifica para la producción de una proteína secretada por la bacteria, la cual es necesaria para maximizar la capacidad de invasión del microorganismo en cultivo de células epiteliales, mientras que el gen pldA codifica la producción de una proteína con actividad similar a la fosfolipasa. También se incluyeron en este estudio dos cepas mutantes del C. jejuni que han sido utilizadas previamente en estudios de colonización. Una de las cepas presenta una mutación en el gen cadF, mientras que la otra presenta una mutación en el gen dnaJ. En los estudios realizados con estas bacterias, no fue posible reaislar el organismo después de la inoculación, mientras que fue posible aislar la bacteria en los animales inoculados con cepas de campo del C. jejuni. Con el fin de determinar si los animales inoculados con las cepas mutantes de C. jejuni adquieren resistencia contra las cepas que no presentan mutaciones en desafíos subsiguientes, algunas de las aves usadas fueron inoculadas por la vía intraperitoneal o por las vías oral e intraperitoneal conjuntamente, con las cepas mutantes de C. jejuni. Los animales inoculados fueron desafiados por la vía oral con cepas de campo de la bacteria. La inoculación con cepas mutantes no proporcionó protección contra el desafío con cepas de campo de la bacteria. Las cepas mutantes y las cepas de campo del C. jejuni no causaron mortalidad ni morbilidad en los animales inoculados en esta parte del estudio. Se concluye que las mutaciones en los genes cadF, dnaJ, pldA y ciaB disminuyen la capacidad de la bacteria para colonizar el ciego, que los animales son capaces de tolerar inoculaciones masivas de estas cepas mutantes y que estas inoculaciones no son capaces de proporcionar una protección significante contra la colonización del ciego ocasionada por las cepas de campo del C. jejuni.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
549
    549
  • Thumbnail: Page 
550
    550
  • Thumbnail: Page 
551
    551
  • Thumbnail: Page 
552
    552
  • Thumbnail: Page 
553
    553
  • Thumbnail: Page 
554
    554
  • Thumbnail: Page 
555
    555
  • Thumbnail: Page 
556
    556
  • Thumbnail: Page 
557
    557