Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Effect of Prolonged Heat Stress in Single-Comb White Leghorn Hens on Progeny Resistance to Salmonella enteritidis Organ Invasion

Morgan B. Farnell, Randle W. Moore, Audrey P. McElroy, Billy M. Hargis and David J. Caldwell
Avian Diseases
Vol. 45, No. 2 (Apr. - Jun., 2001), pp. 479-485
DOI: 10.2307/1592992
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1592992
Page Count: 7
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($12.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Effect of Prolonged Heat Stress in Single-Comb White Leghorn Hens on Progeny Resistance to Salmonella enteritidis Organ Invasion
Preview not available

Abstract

In our laboratory, we have often had difficulty infecting neonatal chickens with invasive salmonellae when ambient temperatures exceed 30 C. We hypothesized that this increased resistance in chicks during warmer months may be associated with heat stress-associated maternal factors. Presently, single-comb white leghorn hens were separated into a non-heat-stressed group, reared under temperatures from approximately 10 to 24 C, and a heat-stressed group, in which environmental temperature was incrementally elevated to near 37 C and maintained for the duration of the 13-wk study. For Expt. 1, eggs from heat-stressed or control hens, collected on days 8-14 of the study, were pooled respective to treatment and incubated. At the time of egg collection, mean hen-day egg production was 51.83% or 65% for heat-stressed or control hens, respectively. On day of hatch, progeny from hens in each group were orally challenged with 0.9× 104 colony-forming units (CFU) Salmonella enteritidis (SE). Rates of SE organ invasion of 97.3% or 94.4% were obtained in progeny from heat-stressed or control hens, respectively. In Expt. 2, eggs from heat-stressed or control hens from days 30-42 of the study were collected and pooled by treatment for incubation. Mean hen-day egg production was 46.5% or 72.85% for heat-stressed or control hens, respectively. On day of hatch, progeny were orally challenged with either 2.2× 103 or 2.2× 104 CFU SE. A 100% incidence in SE organ invasion was observed in all groups. In Expt. 3, eggs were collected from days 43 through 56 of the study. Mean hen-day egg production was 19.8% or 76.8% for heat-stressed or control hens, respectively. On day of hatch, progeny were orally challenged with 2× 103 CFU SE. Rates of SE organ invasion of 95.8% or 95.6% were obtained in progeny from heat-stressed or control hens, respectively. These data suggest that factors other than elevated temperature may be responsible for seasonal resistance to invasive salmonellae infection in neonatal chickens observed in our laboratory during warmer months in Texas. /// Frecuentemente se hace difícil infectar pollitos recién nacidos con Salmonella invasiva cuando las temperaturas ambientales exceden los 30 C. Se ha propuesto la hipótesis de que este aumento en la resistencia de los pollitos durante los meses más calientes puede estar relacionado con el estrés por calor asociado con factores maternales. En el presente estudio se separaron gallinas leghorn blancas de cresta sencilla en un grupo no estresado por calor, criados bajo temperaturas de 10 a 24 C aproximadamente, y en un grupo estresado por calor en el que las temperaturas ambientales fueron hasta de 37 C, mantenidas durante 13 semanas que duró el estudio. En el experimento 1, huevos de gallinas estresadas por calor o gallinas controles recogidos en los días de 8 a 14 del estudio fueron reunidos por cada tratamiento e incubados. En el momento de la colección de los huevos la producción media de huevo por gallina por día era de 51.83% y 65% para las gallinas estresadas por calor y las gallinas controles, respectivamente. Al día de edad, la progenie de las gallinas en cada grupo fue desafiada vía oral con 0.9× 104 unidades formadoras de colonias (UFC) de Salmonella enteritidis. Los porcentajes de invasión de órganos por S. enteritidis en la progenie de gallinas estresadas y gallinas controles fue de 97.3% y 94.4%, respectivamente. En el experimente 2, huevos de gallinas estresadas por calor o gallinas controles, recogidos durante los días 30 a 42 del estudio, fueron reunidos por tratamiento para la incubación. La producción media de huevo por gallina por día era de 46.5% y 72.85% para las gallinas estresadas por calor y las gallinas controles, respectivamente. Al día de edad la progenie se desafió con 2.2× 103 o 2.2× 104 UFC de S. enteritidis. Se observó una incidencia de 100% de invasión de órganos por S. enteritidis en todos los grupos. En el experimento 3 se recogieron huevos durante los días 43 a 56 del estudio. La producción media de huevo por gallina por día era de 19.8% y 76.8% para las gallinas estresadas por calor y las gallinas controles, respectivamente. Al día de edad, la progenie fue desafiada vía oral con 2× 103 UFC de S. enteritidis. Los porcentajes de invasión de órganos por S. enteritidis para la progenie de gallinas estresadas por calor y las gallinas controles fue de 95.8% y 95.6%, respectivamente. Esta información sugiere que además de las temperaturas elevadas, pueden existir otros factores responsables por la resistencia estacional a la infección invasiva por Salmonella observada en este laboratorio durante los meses más calientes en Texas en pollitos recién nacidos.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
479
    479
  • Thumbnail: Page 
480
    480
  • Thumbnail: Page 
481
    481
  • Thumbnail: Page 
482
    482
  • Thumbnail: Page 
483
    483
  • Thumbnail: Page 
484
    484
  • Thumbnail: Page 
485
    485