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Avian Influenza Viruses in Minnesota Ducks during 1998-2000

B. A. Hanson, D. E. Stallknecht, D. E. Swayne, L. A. Lewis and D. A. Senne
Avian Diseases
Vol. 47, Special Issue. Proceedings of the Fifth International Symposium on Avian Influenza (2003), pp. 867-871
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1593359
Page Count: 5
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Avian Influenza Viruses in Minnesota Ducks during 1998-2000
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Abstract

Although wild ducks are known to be a major reservoir for avian influenza viruses (AIV), there are few recent published reports of surveillance directed at this group. Predominant AIV hemagglutinin (HA) subtypes reported in previous studies of ducks in North America include H3, H4, and H6, with the H5, H7, and H9 subtypes not well represented in these host populations. The objective of this study was to determine whether these subtype patterns have persisted. Each September from 1998 to 2000, cloacal swabs were collected from wild ducks banded in Roseau and Marshall counties, MN. Mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) were sampled all years, and northern pintails (A. acuta) were sampled only in 1999. Influenza viruses were isolated from 11%, 14%, and 8% of birds during 1998, 1999, and 2000, respectively. Prevalence, as expected, was highest in juveniles, ranging from 11% to 23% in mallards. Viruses representative of the HA subtypes 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 10, 11, and 12 were isolated. Viruses in the H5, H7, and H9 subtypes, which are associated with high-pathogenicity influenza in poultry or recent infections in humans, were not uncommon, and each of these subtypes was isolated in 2 out of the 3 years of surveillance. /// A pesar de que los patos salvajes son el mayor reservorio de los virus de influenza aviar, pocos reportes recientes sobre la vigilancia epidemiológica dirigida hacia dicho grupo se han publicado. Los subtipos de hemoaglutinina del virus de influenza aviar predominantes en patos de América del Norte reportados en estudios anteriores incluyen los subtipos H3, H4 y H6, mientras los subtipos H5, H7 y H9 no se encuentran representados adecuadamente en estas poblaciones huéspedes. El objetivo de este estudio fue determinar si los patrones de estos subtipos han persistido. Durante el mes de Septiembre desde el año 1998 hasta el 2000, se tomaron hisopos cloacales a partir de patos salvajes obtenidos en los condados de Roseau y Marshall en MN. Todos los años se tomaron muestras en patos ánade azulones (Anas platyrhynchos) y durante 1999 en ánades de cola larga (A. acuta). Se aislaron virus de influenza a partir del 11%, 14% y 8% de las aves durante los años 1998, 1999 y 2000, respectivamente. La mayor prevalencia, como se esperaba, se observó en patos jóvenes, en un rango del 11 al 23% en patos ánades azulones. Se aislaron virus representativos de los subtipos de hemoaglutinina 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 10, 11 y 12. Los virus de los subtipos H5, H7 y H9, los cuales se encuentran asociados con influenza de alta patogenicidad en aves o con infecciones recientes en humanos, fueron comunes, y cada uno de estos subtipos fue aislado en 2 de los 3 años de la vigilancia epidemiológica.

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