Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Recombinant Paramyxovirus Type 1-Avian Influenza-H7 Virus as a Vaccine for Protection of Chickens against Influenza and Newcastle Disease

D. E. Swayne, D. L. Suarez, S. Schultz-Cherry, T. M. Tumpey, D. J. King, T. Nakaya, P. Palese and A. Garcia-Sastre
Avian Diseases
Vol. 47, Special Issue. Proceedings of the Fifth International Symposium on Avian Influenza (2003), pp. 1047-1050
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1593388
Page Count: 4
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($12.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Recombinant Paramyxovirus Type 1-Avian Influenza-H7 Virus as a Vaccine for Protection of Chickens against Influenza and Newcastle Disease
Preview not available

Abstract

Current vaccines to prevent avian influenza rely upon labor-intensive parenteral injection. A more advantageous vaccine would be capable of administration by mass immunization methods such as spray or water vaccination. A recombinant vaccine (rNDV-AIV-H7) was constructed by using a lentogenic paramyxovirus type 1 vector (Newcastle disease virus [NDV] B1 strain) with insertion of the hemagglutinin (HA) gene from avian influenza virus (AIV) A/chicken/NY/13142-5/94 (H7N2). The recombinant virus had stable insertion and expression of the H7 AIV HA gene as evident by detection of HA expression via immunofluorescence in infected Vero cells. The rNDV-AIV-H7 replicated in 9-10 day embryonating chicken eggs and exhibited hemagglutinating activity from both NDV and AI proteins that was inhibited by antisera against both NDV and AIV H7. Groups of 2-week-old white Leghorn chickens were vaccinated with transfectant NDV vector (tNDV), rNDV-AIV-H7, or sterile allantoic fluid and were challenged 2 weeks later with viscerotropic velogenic NDV (vvNDV) or highly pathogenic (HP) AIV. The sham-vaccinated birds were not protected from vvNDV or HP AIV challenge. The transfectant NDV vaccine provided 70% protection for NDV challenge but did not protect against AIV challenge. The rNDV-AIV-H7 vaccine provided partial protection (40%) from vvNDV and HP AIV challenge. The serologic response was examined in chickens that received one or two immunizations of the rNDV-AIV-H7 vaccine. Based on hemagglutination inhibition and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) tests, chickens that received a vaccine boost seroconverted to AIV H7, but the serologic response was weak in birds that received only one vaccination. This demonstrates the potential for NDV for use as a vaccine vector in expressing AIV proteins. /// La vacunas actuales para prevenir la influenza aviar dependen de la inyección parenteral, representando una aumento en la mano de obra empleada. Una vacuna con mayores ventajas sería aquella que pudiera administrarse por aplicación masiva, como la vacunación por aerosol o en el agua de bebida. Se desarrolló una vacuna recombinante (rNDV-AIV-H7) usando un vector paramixovirus tipo 1 (cepa B1 del virus de la enfermedad de Newcastle) con inserción del gen de la hemoaglutinina (HA) del virus de influenza aviar A/pollo/NY/13142-5/94 (H7N2). El virus recombinante presentaba una inserción y expresión estable del gen de la hemoaglutinina H7 como se hizo evidente por la detección de la expresión de la hemoaglutinina por medio de la inmunofluorescencia en células Vero infectadas. El rNDV-AIV-H7 se replicó en huevos embrionados de pollo de 9 a 10 días y mostró actividad hemoaglutinante para ambas proteínas virales, que fueron inhibidas por antisueros contra el virus de Newcastle y contra influenza aviar subtipo H7, respectivamente. Grupos de aves Leghorn de dos semanas de edad fueron vacunadas con el vector transfectante del virus de la enfermedad de Newcastle, con el virus recombinante rNDV-AIV-H7, o con fluido alantoideo estéril. Las aves fueron desafiadas dos semanas después con una cepa velogénica viscerotrópica del virus de Newcastle o con el virus de influenza aviar de alta patogenicidad. Las aves que recibieron el líquido alantoideo no fueron protegidas contra el desafío con el virus velogénico viscerotrópico de Newcastle o con el virus de influenza aviar de alta patogenicidad. La vacuna transfectante de Newcastle confirió 70% de protección contra el desafío de Newcastle pero no contra el desafío contra influenza aviar. La vacuna recombinante rNDV-AIV-H7 confirió protección parcial (40%) contra el desafío de ambos virus. La respuesta serológica fue examinada en pollos que recibieron una o dos inmunizaciones de la vacuna rNDV-AIV-H7. Con base en las pruebas de inhibición de la hemoaglutinación y de ELISA, los pollos que recibieron una vacuna de refuerzo presentaron seroconversión para el virus de influenza H7, pero la respuesta serológica fue débil en las aves que recibieron una sola vacunación. Esto demuestra el potencial del virus de Newcastle para su uso como vector y para expresar proteínas del virus de influenza.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
1047
    1047
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1048
    1048
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1049
    1049
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1050
    1050